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Shogun Fights: From the Fighters’ Perspective

  • Micah Terrill (Keith Mills/Sherdog)
    Micah Terrill (Keith Mills/Sherdog)

    Shogun Fights: From the Fighters’ Perspective

    Chris Huntemann October 12, 2016

    Before John Rallo helped to sanction mixed martial arts in the state of Maryland in 2009, any fighter who called the “Free State” home had to travel far and wide to apply his or her wares in the fight game. But Rallo did much more than just help to sanction events. He created one of his own. The first Shogun Fights card took place in Baltimore in 2009. The promotion has called “Charm City” home ever since.

     

    As Rallo prepares to present the 15th edition of Shogun Fights on Saturday, Oct. 15, Maryland-based fighters Dan Root, Jon Delbrugge, James “Binky” Jones, Micah Terrill, Rob Sullivan and Francisco Isata reflected on their experiences with the only Maryland-based MMA organization.

     

    “I heard [about the organization] through my former coach,” Root told Combat Press. “I had a lot of mutual friends with John Rallo, but I had not started training at Ground Control [Baltimore, where Rallo is head trainer] yet. I talked to him, and he put me on the first card. I thought it was great that it was happening — I always traveled to fight before.”

     

    “I’ve been with John most of my career,” said Jones. “We were in Russia in 2009 and it was late at night, and John was typing away at his computer. I asked him what he was doing, and he said, ‘I’m trying to legalize MMA in Maryland.’ I was excited about it. I’ve fought all over the place, but thought that this was the perfect opportunity.”

     

    “I’m excited that it started,” said Terrill. “I bought a scalped ticket to an event, and people asked when I would fight on it. I’m not sure it was my dream to fight for Shogun, but it’s beyond anything I ever dreamed.”

     

    “I heard before I started fighting that the bill to legalize it was passed,” said Sullivan. “I knew John was involved, but I was pretty preoccupied with my band and training jiu-jitsu at the time. But I had it in my head that it was happening [and] that I would fight on there.”

    “I was around on the amateur circuit and I cornered someone at Shogun Fights before, so I saw how big the stage was,” said Isata. “So, I had a better understanding of it when I fought on it for the first time.”

     

    “The best thing about it is the production value,” added Root. “It’s so good — and second only to the UFC, in my opinion. Everything goes smoothly and it’s the best I’ve seen. But it was odd for me to see close to 6,000 people. I was used to fighting in front of a few hundred people. But I was so nervous the first time I fought for Shogun that when I walked down the ramp, I grabbed a box and puked in it and thought, ‘Holy fuck, there are a lot of people.’ I was one of the first to be a part of something and part of pro MMA in Maryland, so that was pretty cool.”

     

    “I was super impressed by the first show I fought on,” said Delbrugge. “It’s amazing just to be there and to see a lot of guys who fight on the card being able to make it their career.”

     

    “I was a little nervous,” admitted Jones. “I was ready to rock in the back, and I was carrying the Maryland flag when I walked out. And the place just exploded. I just froze. I never had that feeling before. I went back to being a little kid and watching LL Cool J perform in that same arena. People thought I was just taking a picture, but I zoned in on my opponent in the cage and we had an awesome fight. It was an amazing, awesome feeling.”

     

    “It was nerve-racking, but it was also awesome,” Terrill said of his first appearance with Shogun Fights. “The hair was standing up on the back of my neck. It was definitely a pretty big deal to be in front of thousands of people.”

     

    “The one thing I remember is missing weight by half a pound,” said Sullivan. “I took off my underwear and the scale said I was one pound off because it was a piece of shit, but they changed the scale because I complained. It was a little intimidating stepping into that cage for the first time, because it’s a white canvas and a large arena. All you see is the referee and the person you’re fighting. You don’t pay attention to what’s around you. It’s a little different than fighting in a small casino or a 1,000-person hall, and I was super green, so my wrestling just took over.

     

    “I also remember one year, there was going to be a Disney on Ice event the following weekend. The arena floor was already iced, and they put planks of wood over it and you had to walk across the plywood to get to the cage. It was cold as shit, and I remember having to stand there for 15 minutes and I was freezing.”

     

    “Coming from amateur fights in Virginia, this show was a lot bigger and there were cameras and interviews,” said Isata. “I had so many emotions, and it was my first weight cut to 145 pounds, and I had a tough opponent for my first fight. So I was more focused than anything else on just fighting.”

     

    And how have these veterans of the promotion seen Shogun Fights evolve over its first 15 cards?

     

    “The talent,” said Root. “People have fought on big shows or gone to big shows. Adding championships was genius, and it’s been built up correctly. We have an educated fan base too. You never hear people boo when the fight goes to the ground, unlike in the UFC. They create videos of the guys who fight and you develop a personal attachment to them. I’ve been on other shows that are a complete clusterfuck, but Shogun has built up championship contenders like me, Micah, Rob Watley [and] Cole Presley. Fans have seen us for years and can develop a personal attachment and grow with us. People can build their career here.”

     

    “Shogun is the best venue I’ve ever competed in and my favorite to fight for,” said Delbrugge. “It’s most like the UFC that I’ve ever seen, and the only show I fight on that takes place in an arena. Shogun looks like the UFC with its production. It’s fantastic and it’s good to do it twice a year. It doesn’t water down the talent, and it definitely gets you ready for the UFC. If you can fight in Shogun Fights’ atmosphere, that’s exactly how it is in the UFC.”

     

    “The Sheffield Institute continue to improve with the production,” Jones said. “It’s just the beginning. They do an amazing job doing what they love. John Rallo and his staff treat you like pros, and other shows don’t have that. Each card has amazing fights and the competition goes uphill, not downhill.”

     

    “There’s definitely more promotion now,” noted Sullivan. “It’s definitely gotten bigger with the titles, and the guys at the top of the card are getting closer to the UFC. Shogun is making a nice, steady progression with a lot more television promos. I’m getting texts from people saying that I’m in it, and that they see it on Comedy Central and HGTV.”

    Watch Shogun Fight XV Promo Video

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